Thursday, June 25, 2015

10 Ways We're Ruining Our Hair Without Even Knowing it

When I was younger, I absolutely hated my hair. It was, and I know I've written this before, a pile of wavy, frizz grossness. I didn't know about products for curly-haired girls, and chances are most of them didn't even exist back then. So, I resorted to flat ironing my hair on a regular basis, coloring the heck out of it, and just being all-around mean to my hair.

Now, I've finally learned to embrace my curls (with a ton of styling products thrown in), and only flat iron it a few times a month. But even I still make mistakes.

Here are the top damaging hair mistakes that most of us don't even realize we're making:

1. Not Cleaning Beauty Tools
Dirty utensils--brushes, combs, straighteners, curling irons--recycle grime into fresh, clean hair, which can irritate your scalp and clog pores on your head. and for the love of god, please get rid of those things when they pass their expiration dates (yes, those exist).

2. Spending Too Much Time in the Sun
I always forget this one. You need to apply SPF something-or-other all over every inch of your body and that includes your hair. Certain sprays and leave-in conditioners are loaded with secret sunscreen, so keep an eye out for those on labels.

3. Drying Hair with a Towel

Another one I still have a hard time avoiding... It's a huge no-no for those with big waves or curls to use a towel to dry your hair. Why? Those types of hair are naturally drier than other hair types. The rough fabrics will agitate the cuticles in your hair, causing unnecessary friction (and frizz). Instead, opt for a microfiber towel or cotton T-shirt.

4. Forcing Knots to Come Out
Ditch the skinny little comb--paddle brushes are where it's at. If you're trying to untangle a knot with a comb, there's no flexibility to the tool, which is a real pain for your hair to deal with and it causes breakage. Paddle brushes have a special cushion so that you can gently work to unravel your hair.

5. Eating Poorly
Okay, I'm not exactly great at when it comes to healthy eating (ex: my many McDonald's trips each month), but it's gotta be said: you really are what you put inside your body. Water and vitamins A, C, and E are are vital for your hair to maintain its glossy texture.

6. Pulling Back Sunglasses

You know when you step indoors and pull your shades over your head because, well, you're not outside? Yeah, you're totally killing your follicles. Not only does that pressure from your glasses stress out the hair, but you also risk plucking strands when you step back into sunlight and pull the glasses over your eyes again. Just avoid it.

7. Overwashing
Though it depends on the hair type, chances are you do not need to wash your hair everyday. I wash mine a couple times a week. Plus, you can even train your hair to go along with this--yes, the first couple weeks suck, but in the long run, your hair will thank you.

8. Dyeing Hair Frequently
Surprise, suprise! Something else I do a bunch, although not in a crazy way. Touching up your roots/highlights every four to six weeks is perfectly normal. If you're going every two weeks, just...no. Hair dye chemicals make your head more delicate and fragile to work with.

9. Going Overboard with Dry Shampoo
Yes, dry shampoo has gotten me out of quite a few jams, especially when I feel like crap and need to be somewhere quickly, but don't want to spend the hour it takes to fully wash and style my hair.  That said, too much of the good stuff can leave your hair dull and can even block your scalp's pores, which can cause pimples or cysts.

10. Wearing Tight Hairstyles

I used to wear my ponytails and buns a bit too tightly, just to keep it in place. But even I notices the severe breakage it was causing! I mean, this about it--styles like that are literally pulling the life out of your follicles.

Now go forth and treat your gorgeous hair with some dignity!

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